2-D Materials Go Beyond Graphene


2-D Materials Go Beyond Graphene - Featured Graphene Other 2D materials research
This stack of separable Ti3C2 sheets (yellow micrograph, bottom) is one example of a MXene. Researchers have made a large variety of MXenes, which exhibit M2X, M3X2, and M4X3 stoichiometries, in which M is an early transition metal and X is carbon or nitrogen (models, top).


In the excitement after the isolation of , materials chemists and other scientists began scrutinizing the periodic table for opportunities to make other molecularly thin materials. Driven by the chance to explore uncharted scientific territory and to discover technologically useful materials, these researchers quickly produced many examples of so-called two-dimensional materials beyond graphene. The growing list now includes a large set of metal carbides (MXenes), a family of single-element graphene analogs (Xenes), a number of transition metal dichalcogenides, ultrathin organic crystals, and two-component nitrides.

Despite being just a single layer of carbon atoms, graphene sure can excite engineers and scientists. Unlike bulk graphite, the ultrathin material boasts flexibility, strength, and possibly enticing electronic properties for researchers to exploit in novel applications. Graphene mania crescendoed in 2010 when the material’s discovery was the subject of that year’s Nobel Prize in Physics. Since that time, researchers worldwide have been enthralled with vanishingly thin and have succeeded in preparing a wide variety of so-called two-dimensional materials beyond graphene.

This story is about those other 2-D materials. They hail from across the periodic table and include an assortment of transition metals, carbon-group elements, chalcogenides, and others. Researchers are taking this trip through the periodic table in search of the ultrathin because, like graphene, some of the materials they’re making sport impressive properties that surpass those of their thicker counterparts.


The full story is available below.