Scientists Show Growing Atom-Thin Sheets On Cones Allows Control Of Defects In 2D Material

Scientists Show Growing Atom-Thin Sheets On Cones Allows Control Of Defects In 2D Material - Featured Graphene Other 2D materials
Two-dimensional materials grown onto a cone allow control over where defects called grain boundaries appear. These defects can be used to enhance the materials’ useful properties. (Courtesy of the Yakobson Group)

Researchers from Rice University have discovered a way to manipulate 2D materials to design in defects that improve the materials’ properties.

The Rice lab of Theoretical Physicist Boris Yakobson and colleagues at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are merging theory and experimentation to demonstrate it is possible to give 2D materials particular defects, especially atomic-scale seams known as grain boundaries. These boundaries may be used to improve the materials’ electronic, optical, mechanical, magnetic and catalytic properties.

The idea is to introduce a curvature to the landscape that coerces the way defects propagate. The Researchers refer to this as “tilt grain boundary topology,” and they accomplish it by growing their materials on a topographically curved substrate — in this case, a cone. The angle of the cone dictates what type and where the boundaries appear.

The research paper has been published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

Grain boundaries are the borders that form in a material where edges meet in a mismatch. These boundaries are a series of defects; for instance, when two sheets of hexagonal meet at an angle, the carbon atoms make up for it by forming non-hexagonal (five or seven member) rings.

 

The full story is available below.

Source: AZO NANO

LEAVE A REPLY