MIT Researchers Develop Flexible Graphene Solar Cells

MIT Researchers Develop Flexible Graphene Solar Cells - Featured Graphene Solar

Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Initiative have developed new flexible and transparent cells, which can be mounted on surfaces ranging from glass to plastic to paper and tape.

Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Energy Initiative have developed new flexible and transparent graphene solar cells, which can be mounted on surfaces ranging from glass to plastic to paper and tape.

Until now, developers of transparent solar cells have typically relied on expensive, brittle electrodes that tend to crack when the device is flexed.

However, graphene, a form of carbon that occurs in one-atom-thick sheets, is highly conductive, flexible, robust, and transparent.

In addition, a graphene electrode can be just one nanometer thick, a fraction as thick as the most widely used current option indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode and a far better match for the thin organic solar cell itself.

 

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SourceCTBR

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