Scientists Produce Robust Catalyst To Split Water Into Hydrogen, Oxygen

Scientists Produce Robust Catalyst To Split Water Into Hydrogen, Oxygen - Featured Graphene research
A catalyst developed by Rice University and the University of Houston splits water into hydrogen and oxygen without the need for expensive metals like platinum. This electron microscope image shows nickel foam coated with and then the catalytic surface of iron, manganese and phosphorus. Credit: Desmond Schipper/Rice University

Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen to produce clean can be simplified with a single catalyst developed by scientists at Rice University and the University of Houston.

The electrolytic film produced at Rice and tested at Houston is a three-layer structure of nickel, graphene and a compound of iron, manganese and phosphorus. The foamy nickel gives the film a large surface, the conductive graphene protects the nickel from degrading and the metal phosphide carries out the reaction.

The robust material is the subject of a paper in Nano Energy.

Rice chemist Kenton Whitmire and Houston electrical and computer engineer Jiming Bao and their labs developed the film to overcome barriers that usually make a catalyst good for producing either or hydrogen, but not both simultaneously.

“Regular metals sometimes oxidize during catalysis,” Whitmire said. “Normally, a hydrogen evolution reaction is done in acid and an oxygen evolution reaction is done in base. We have one material that is stable whether it’s in an acidic or basic solution.”

The full story is available below.

Source: Phys.org

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