Columbia Researchers Observe Exotic Quantum Particle In Bilayer Graphene

  • Columbia Researchers Observe Exotic Quantum Particle In Bilayer Graphene - Featured Graphene Latest Innovations
    The so-called 5/2 state has confounded scientists for several decades. While all known particles in the universe are classified as either bosons or fermions, the 5/2 state, which emerges only in a 2D electron gas under large magnetic fields, is thought to be an exotic new type of particle that doesn’t fit either description. Previously this state has been observed only in the highest mobility semiconductor heterostructures when cooled to milikelvin temperatures, making it challenging to confirm its expected properties. Recently however, researchers at Columbia found evidence of an equivalent state in bilayer , appearing at temperatures more than 10 times larger than in conventional systems. Credit: Cory Dean/Columbia University

    Physicists prove a 30-year-old theory–the even-denominator fractional quantum Hall state–and establish bilayer graphene as a promising platform that could lead to quantum computation.

    A team led by Cory Dean, assistant professor of physics at Columbia University, and James Hone, Wang Fong-Jen Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia Engineering, has definitively observed an intensely studied anomaly in condensed matter physics—the even-denominator fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state—via transport measurement in bilayer graphene. The study is published online today in Science (October 6 issue).

    “Observing the 5/2 state in any system is a remarkable scientific opportunity, since it encompasses some of the most perplexing concepts in modern condensed matter physics, such as emergence, quasi-particle formation, quantization, and even superconductivity,” Dean says. “Our observation that, in bilayer graphene, the 5/2 state survives to much higher temperatures than previously thought possible not only allows us to study this phenomenon in new ways, but also shifts our view of the FQH state from being largely a scientific curiosity to now having great potential for real-world applications, particularly in quantum computing.”

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