Taming ‘Wild’ Electrons In Graphene

  • Taming Wild Electrons In Graphene - Electronics Featured Graphene
    Credit: Yuhang Jiang/Rutgers University-New Brunswick. A sharp tip creates a force field that can trap electrons in or modify their trajectories, similar to the effect a lens has on light rays.

Graphene – a one-atom-thick layer of the stuff in pencils – is a better conductor than copper and is very promising for electronic devices, but with one catch: Electrons that move through it can’t be stopped.

Until now, that is. Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have learned how to tame the unruly electrons in graphene, paving the way for the ultra-fast transport of electrons with low loss of in novel systems. Their study was published online in Nature Nanotechnology.

“This shows we can electrically control the electrons in graphene,” said Eva Y. Andrei, Board of Governors professor in Rutgers’ Department of Physics and Astronomy in the School of Arts and Sciences and the study’s senior author. “In the past, we couldn’t do it. This is the reason people thought that one could not make devices like transistors that require switching with graphene, because their electrons run wild.”

Now it may become possible to realize a graphene nano-scale transistor, Andrei said. Thus far, graphene components include ultra-fast amplifiers, supercapacitors and ultra-low resistivity wires. The addition of a graphene transistor would be an important step towards an all-graphene electronics platform. Other graphene-based applications include ultra-sensitive chemical and biological , filters for desalination and water purification. Graphene is also being developed in flat flexible screens, and paintable and printable electronic circuits.

The full story is available below.

SourceNews Wise

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