Regulation Of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials For Lithium-Ion Batteries

Regulation Of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials For Lithium-Ion Batteries
Regulation Of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials For Lithium-Ion Batteries
Regulation Of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials For Lithium-Ion Batteries - Energy Featured Graphene
Strategies for improving the lithium storage properties of 2D nanosheets. Credit: ©Science China Press

Li-ion (LIBs) are advantageous storage devices due to their higher specific energy density, lower self-discharge, and lower memory effect. Among the components of batteries, electrode materials play a key role in enhancing electrochemical properties. Thus, the development of advanced electrode materials for high-performance LIBs is a major objective in related fields.

Two-dimensional (2-D) nanomaterials, including , transition metal oxide (TMO) nanosheets, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanosheets, etc., are composed of one or several monolayers of atoms (or unit cells). They have outstanding physical and chemical properties in contrast to their bulk counterparts. The integration of 2-D nanomaterials with could overcome major challenges driven by ever-growing global energy demands. Unfortunately, the direct use of these sheet-like materials is challenging due to a serious self-agglomerating tendency, relatively low conductivity, and obvious volume changes over repeated charging-discharging cycles.

In a new review paper published in National Science Review, scientists from Australia at Queensland University of Technology and University of Wollongong summarized recent progress on the strategies for enhancing the lithium storage performance of 2-D nanomaterials. These strategies for manipulating the structures and properties are expected to meet the major challenges for in energy storage applications. Co-authors Jun Mei, Yuanwen Zhang, Ting Liao, Ziqi Sun and Shi Xue Dou identified three primary strategies: hybridization with conductive materials, surface/edge functionalization, and structural optimization.

The full story is available below.

Source: Phys.org

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